Home Tip Tuesday: Home Siding Options

Consider budget, your home's style and personal preference when choosing siding.

There are many options for home siding. The right choice of material may depend on your home's style, your budget, and your personal preference. Learn the pros and cons of working with common home siding materials. 

Siding Material Options:

Fiber Cement Panels
A more modern choice, fiber cement panels work well for contemporary homes. If you have an older style of home, this siding option may not be the best choice. The panels come in large rectangles, generally 4 feet by 8 feet. Thin lines appear at the intersection of these panels. 

Wood Siding 
A classic (though pricey) option, wood siding comes in many different varieties of hard wood. Wood siding can work in modern, classic, or historic homes, depending on the type of siding that's chosen. 

Wood siding is durable, but requires maintenance to look its best over time. Whether you paint or stain the wood, you'll need to keep up with the work. Otherwise, water can penetrate the siding and cause damage, including rot and mold. 

Metal 

Aluminum and corrugated metal siding are two other options to consider. The industrial look and feel of metal could work well in urban homes or contemporary homes, yet metal siding can also be a wise choice for a farm house. Metal can be painted to appear more natural, and needs little maintenance once installed. Metal siding is earth friendly, long lasting, and naturally repels heat. While somewhat unconventional, it could be a good option.

This home features all three styles: shingles, board and batten, and lap siding.
Via Living and Kitchen


Siding Style Options:

Shingles 
Shingles pair well with Craftsman, Cape, and Arts and Crafts style homes. Available in wood, vinyl, and fiber cement, shingles are a common home siding choice. While wood shingles will be pricier, vinyl can make shingles a more affordable option if you like that style. 

Shingles are pricier than lap siding to install due to the higher amount of labor it takes to place each shingle, so it's worth bearing in mind before selecting shingles. 

Board and Batten 
If your home has vertical rather than horizontal siding, board and batten is an excellent option. It's also available in both wood and fiber cement, so you can select the better option for your budget. Board and batten siding makes your house look taller and it's a classic look for barns, farm houses, and other rural homes. This siding costs roughly as much as its horizontal cousin, lap siding. 

Lap siding

Horizontal lap siding is the most common choice for home siding, and is available in many materials. Choose from vinyl, wood, fiber cement, and even aluminum. Lap siding is quite common on historic houses, from Victorians to colonials. Since there are so many variations of lap siding, the cost for installation and maintenance requirements vary too. Vinyl is always a budget friendly option. 

Before you select the choice of material, obtain quotes from contractors near you. The labor and installation costs, when added to the cost of materials, could impact your choice. Siding is worth spending on, since it protects your home and affects your curb appeal. 

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